How to become a player in global affairs

May 07 , 2019 | Social Good

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I was recently invited to The Carter Center's commemoration of the 40th anniversary of U.S.-China relations in Atlanta, where I met Professor David Lampton - a foremost thinker on the two countries. In this podcast, he describes his early adventures as a student in the 1960s, the way he centers his work through people and their voices, and how he has built a career around two fascinating countries and the world they shape.

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