If we didn't have the United Nations, we would live in a very bad world

Jun 04 , 2019 | Social Good

Listen Now

Listen On: apple music

Professor Ilona Kickbusch is one of the world's foremost thinkers and visionaries on global health.

A key architect of the 1986 Ottawa Charter, one of the most vital international agreements on health promotion, her innovative work has transformed the world and our most vulnerable communities in particular. Currently at Geneva’s Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Ilona has had a distinguished career, including at the World Health Organization and Yale University.

She has also helped train many of today’s health leaders in China. In this interview, James Chau brings her back to her early years in India, and how being the child of a German diplomat helped shape her career and the influence she continues to exercise.  

SEE MORE EPISODES

Recent Episodes
  • Nov 21 , 2019 | Social Good
    The world is fighting a global war on waste that threatens to overrun our planet, and China is on the frontlines of the unprecedented battle.
  • Nov 19 , 2019 | Social Good
    Doutzen Kroes is not only one of the world's most famous supermodels, she's also a passionate conservationist and a global ambassador for Knot On My Planet, an organization dedicated to saving the elephants.
  • Nov 15 , 2019 |
    To mark COP25, the biggest climate change conference of the year, the China Current is proud to present a special series of interviews with global leaders, decision-makers, and activists who are confronting the biggest threat to our planet. Join us over the next month as James Chau speaks to: Nobel Peace Prize laureate Muhammad Yunus, primatologist Jane Goodall, conservationist and supermodel Doutzen Kroes, and more. We begin with Mary Robinson, former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, former President of Ireland, and current Chair of the Elders. She shares how the birth of her grandchild 16 years ago caused her to re-think her ideas on climate change, and the devastation we are causing not only to the planet, but to our own survival.